The ultimate software development tool

Best practices on project management, issue tracking and support

Month: December 2018

Don’t Set New Year’s Resolutions – Create Reusable Components

With the new year just around the corner, we’re entering the season of New Year’s’ Resolutions. Prepare yourself for overcrowded gyms and inspirational Instagram quotes tagged with #bigdreams.

If that’s not quite your style, I’d like to introduce you to a very different way of making progress on your goals: Component Thinking.

Instead of fixating on far-off, audacious horizons, Component Thinking has you focus your efforts on creating small, reusable components in the short term, knowing that you’ll be able to assemble them into something bigger in the future.

Digital work is made up of components

Every work product is made up of smaller parts, which I will call “components.” This is true of physical products, but it’s not very easy to take them apart and put them together in a different form. But for digital products, reuse is easy.

Any snippet of text can be copied and pasted anywhere else. Any image or video can be edited and uploaded to different places. And of course, a piece of code can be reused in different parts of a software program, or even in different programs.

Here are some simple examples of how to create reusable components:

  • If you create a lot of business proposals, make a proposal template you can use again and again
  • If you often design websites, start collecting web clippings of websites you like in a notes app
  • Instead of just updating your resume every few years, start collecting work deliverables you could show off in a portfolio
  • If you find yourself writing the same onboarding email multiple items, make it into a knowledge base article that you can reference with just a link
  • If there is a common customer service issue you have to deal with, record a 2-minute screen capture that you can upload to your website

These actions are valuable not just for one-time use, but for many possible future needs. A template for business proposals is inherently valuable, independently of any specific proposal. A notebook full of model websites could be useful in any kind of web design project. A portfolio is always a good thing to have, whether you’re applying for jobs or raising a round of funding.

Having many of these components ready and waiting gives you a few powerful benefits:

  • Each one gives you optionality, increasing the number of options you can consider
  • Each one helps you take action more quickly, because you can reuse past work instead of starting from scratch
  • Each one can remove uncertainty by testing assumptions, making future projects less risky
  • You can improve components incrementally over time, by tweaking and adjusting them each time you use them, instead of trying to make all the improvements at once

The modularity of digital work

The impermanence of digital work can often feel like a curse. Nothing ever seems to be finished. We rarely get to celebrate a clear-cut completion. But we can turn this curse into a blessing – if nothing is ever final, there’s no point in waiting to get started!

Instead of waiting until you have all the pieces in place, launch a basic version and upgrade it slowly over time:

  • Launch a beta version of your app, knowing that any component of it can be added later through software updates
  • Send out a draft of your blog post, knowing that you can update the text at any time
  • Self-publish an ebook on the Kindle platform, knowing that any update to the manuscript will automatically be synced wirelessly to anyone who has purchased the book
  • Publish a simple, one-page website with a photo and a bio, and add a new page every few months when you have extra time

Digital work is naturally modular – the various components that make up a product can be created at different times, evolve at different speeds, and be swapped in and out. We can take advantage of this modularity to make progress on our goals in small pieces, instead of in one huge leap.

Solving problems by making things

Most people solve problems through analysis, which means “separating” the problem into smaller parts. The way makers solve problems is through synthesis – by making things and testing them. There is nothing like a tangible thing placed in front of a real human being to bring a dose of reality forcefully into a project.

The best components are those that:

  • Answer questions or test assumptions
  • Simplify or speed up future projects
  • Make future decisions faster or easier
  • Need to be done anyway

People are often afraid to start on projects until they know they will succeed. But this is like waiting to cross town until all the traffic lights are green at once. It won’t ever happen. We have to make progress whenever and however we can.

By focusing our efforts on creating multipurpose, reusable components, we are preparing the ground so that we can quickly take action when an opportunity presents itself. Instead of waiting for the conditions to be just right, we are actively revealing assumptions, learning new skills, and preparing the resources we’ll need.

This new year, instead of setting a flashy resolution, try creating a reusable component.

Tiago Forte teaches people how to capture their knowledge, organize their digital life, and create reusable components, among other things, in his online course Building a Second Brain. Save $100 on the course using code FOGBUGZ (first 25 only).

Collecting Feedback From Stakeholders Can Help You Build Software That Matters

If you want to build great products that your end users will love, collecting feedback early and often is a key step in this process. You also want to ensure that you are not just collecting feedback from the end-users but also from stakeholders within your organization. No matter if it is Charly from Marketing or Cindy from Finance, everyone’s feedback plays a vital role in building the best version of your product or software.

An unwavering and fierce commitment to not just gathering the feedback but collecting, organizing, and sharing the feedback plays a vital role in pushing your product and business forward. Feedback collection in software projects is more than bug reporting. You want to collect experiences and feelings that the users have with your software. The people side of end-user feedback helps you to shape the customer experience of your digital product. Based on a Walker study, 86% of buyers are willing to pay more for a great customer experience.

Why Feedback Matters

Frequent feedback drives and informs your decision making, saves valuable time in the long run, and influences your product/software roadmap.

Feedback is also necessary for measuring satisfaction among your current customers. These are some of your most valuable stakeholders and the kinds of things you are hearing back from your current customers should definitely not be ignored. Use the feedback to create valuable action items to continue to improve your offerings.

Haymo Meran, head of product

Learning and managing how customers view your product, support, and the company overall continues to prove invaluable. By using early and frequent user testing you can uncover things customers may not know they’re thinking about or problems they may not know they’re struggling with. This will provide you with a clear path to make the product and experience better.

If you layer user feedback through every stage of software development, not just at the beginning or the end, you are able to move fast and deliver quality. You can capture feedback manually or with tools  (for internal & external feedback). With integrations available between feedback collection tools/bug tracking/user feedback applications (like Usersnap) and project management software (like FogBugz), you can cover all your bases in the need for feedback from everyone involved.

Screenshot: Usersnap + FogBugz integrated

“How To Do It” Manually

There are many manual ways to capture feedback from users in real time that can sometimes prove to still be effective. Manual feedback collection can be valuable in connecting with the people side of your software or product, especially internally within your organization. During this Digital Age, with technology keeping us connected more than ever, reaching out through email or live chat can be quick and easy. Here are some ways you can quickly capture feedback from the people side:

  • Creating a feedback survey
: Using applications like Survey Monkey, you can quickly and easily create a comprehensive survey to determine things like how the user feels about your software overall? The ease of use? etc. Stakeholders easily reach this survey through a link or from within an email.
  • Direct email and customer contact forms
: Email is one of the most valuable ways to gather candid customer feedback. Sometimes you won’t get a specific answer to your question until you ask. Many people still want to feel valued and like their opinion matters. So you can capitalize on this by simply sending an email and asking what they think.
  • Direct exploratory user interviews: 
It is very true that understanding your stakeholders and users is often as easy as talking to them directly. This can be accomplished through a face-to-face interview or through online video chat applications like Zoom.
  • Through social media
: Social media is a very powerful (and becoming more and more powerful) tool to reach your stakeholders and prospective customer base. There’s always direct comments to your probing social media post or mentions on social networks. But many social networks now have effective polling tools built in. All you have to do is simply ask a question that you want users to respond to.

The downside to manually reaching out to people to collect feedback is not on the front side, but on the backside when you receive responses. It can quickly become very difficult to differentiate the feedback and organize it so that you can learn from it and create action items. Next thing you know you’re getting isses reported, bug reports, and customer feedback from different channels all over the place. Your alerts start going crazy and you start getting pinged on Slack, email, or even in person from teammates about a button that doesn’t look like it is sized right or a request from a user for additional functionality they suggest for in the future. When feedback is reported through different channels, it quickly becomes hard for product managers to get a single backlog of all the user feedback that needs their attention—let alone organize and prioritize the most critical items for necessary immediate action.

This is why it is effective, time-saving and cost-effective to utilize powerful comprehensive tools and technology that can do this for you and allow you and your team to deliver great products faster.

“How To Do It” Effectively

Manual processes are often a lot of work. That is why we suggest a more automated way. If you utilize an automated feedback software, you can capture feedback effectively where it happens and where your users are. This software should be working inside your website or web-based application directly within the browser. After capturing this feedback you need, a software for that can manage all of the responses and move them to the appropriate development teams.

If you use a visual user feedback application in conjunction with a powerful project management software, you will quickly learn how much easier the flow of feedback into your product will become.

There is actually a powerful combination of tools available that can make your feedback collection completely streamlined. You can easily utilize the software program Usersnap for feedback capturing and FogBugz, which is seamlessly integrated, for managing thousands of feedback items.

FogBugz is a comprehensive project management software that helps you spend less time on managing and organizing and more time on creating great digital products. Through a project management system like this, you can easily align your team under a common purpose and set of goals. This allows you to plan, track, and release great software and products. FogBugz provides all you need to make great software, including project management, issue tracking, and support, fused with just enough process to help you deliver. Plus, there’s robust integration with other best of breed tools like Usersnap, Slack, GitHub, and Google Docs.

Screenshot: FogBugz

With the seamless integration of FogBugz and Usersnap, you can save valuable time and resources, and also improve accuracy in bug reporting and feedback versus manual methods.  Used by over 20,000 software development teams, FogBugz is a system that makes it easy to monitor your projects. It helps your team to focus on the tasks that need to be done. You can capture features, tasks, and customer requests in a central location.

Now that you’ve got the project management side covered you have to take a look at your testing and feedback tool side. Bug tracking, website testing, and issue tracking with Usersnap have never been easier. Utilizing the built-in point and click issue reporting, you get visual feedback and additional information faster into your FogBugz project. Now, no you don’t have to ever worry about endless bug reporting for your users again.

Once you have successfully connected Usersnap with FogBugz, you will receive annotated screenshots to your FogBugz project, along with records of advanced client-side JavaScript errors as they occur, every time a bug report or feedback is created with Usersnap. This helps to bring designers, developers, and project managers together on the same page better than many other alternatives. It is very true that a screenshot often paints a thousand words and helps you deliver great products faster.

Screenshot: Usersnap feedback widget in a website

Using a bug tracking and visual feedback application like Usersnap allows your customers or stakeholders to provide a visual description of what might be a bug in form of annotated screenshots. You also get important information such as what browser was used, the used operating system, and the exact location or URL where the bug has occurred. Your testers have the option to use a drawing pen, a highlighting tool, and sticky notes to illustrate and annotate the bug report. With a screen capturing tool enabled you’ll get so much more out of the bug reports in your project management system.

“Usersnap is a great tool for real-time user experience reporting. Our development team relies on Usersnap to effectively capture bugs and user issues as they relate to the user experience. Kudos to Usersnap for easy user adoption.” Tim Smith, HLT

You can solve your project management tickets in FogBugz faster with browser screenshots from your feedback software like Usersnap.

Get detailed information on the integration of Usersnap and FogBugz.

Screenshot: Dashboard of Usersnap

Wrapping It Up

Discovering issues and bugs during the development stage of your product or software saves your precious resources, time, and money compared to if they are just detected during testing or worse during the application launch phase. You want to utilize effective visual testing and feedback through all phases of development.

Utilizing an integration of a project management software and a user testing platform can help you keep your feedback organized and prioritized so that you can address the most pressing issues and create action items to move your team forward on.

Usersnap helps Making Feedback Matter and FogBugz helps Building Software that Matters.
Perfect combination or what? ☺

Start your free 15-days trial of Usersnap seamlessly integrated with FogBugz along with your FogBugz subscription if you haven’t already. No credit card. No strings attached.

Klaus-M. Schremser
Head of Growth, Usersnap