It can be difficult to know just how much detail you should include in your test documentation and particularly in test cases.

Each case has a different set of needs and requirements in terms of purpose, usage, frequency and admin needs.

If it’s written at a too high level, then you’re leaving it open to too much interpretation and risking the accuracy of the testing. If it’s at a too low level, you’re just wasting your own time. It makes the maintenance more difficult and there’s an opportunity cost to other projects with demands on your time.

In this post, we break down some of the factors you should consider helping you find the right level.

Understand the Wider Context

Each of your project’s stakeholders will have concerns that will impact the amount of detail you need to provide. From your organization’s internal politics and appetite for risk to the extent to which the product is relied upon etc. This will provide a wider context for your test cases and start to improve your thinking. The documentation expectations at a lean startup may even differ greatly to that at some of the financial institutions.

Test Requirements and Resources

You need to provide enough information to describe the intent of the test case. This should clear all the elements that need to be tested. A special consideration should be given to any specific input values or a particular sequence of actions.

The amount of time you have to invest in the test case and the human or IT resources you have to enact the tests is obviously another key factor.

Know Your Audience

Also, consider the audience for each case. How technical are they? How much product knowledge do they have and how experienced at testing are they? More experienced testers who are familiar with the product will need fewer details but is the team likely to change in a foreseeable future? If so, then you might want to head off re-writes later by providing extra details now for those with less experience.

Some organizations have specific requirements to provide evidence of test coverage. Usually, it’s to show adherence for compliance to a standard or certification or for other legal issues.

Test and Product Considerations

Each test is different, from the importance of the test, to how long it will be in use for. If it’s likely to convert to an automated test script in the future, then including more details at that time might make it easier to do. There are similar considerations about the product you’re testing. Will the application be used in long-term? And are whereabouts in its lifecycle? The amount of change that you can expect for a recently built, an agile application is far greater than for some old system you’re maintaining. Unless it’s a wild, testless code beast that is.

There’s a Balance to be Found

These factors don’t necessarily mean you should include more detail but crucial and long-lasting tests justify the time if needed. However, there’s a balance to be sought. If you create highly specific tests, then even minor design changes or functionality alterations may mean you have to re-write the cases. They also lead testers to raise bugs for what end up creating problems with the test documentation, rather than impacting customers. They can have a knock-on effect too. They encourage the tester to only consider the specific paths through the application detailed in the case. Meaning they might not consider the functionality from a broader perspective.

There’s no silver bullet for coming to a conclusion, each organization’s requirements differ. And these requirements change depending on the project, product and individual tests. However, considering the factors above, you can find a level that works for you and your team.