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Startup Advices From Naomi Freeman

We had the pleasure to interview the coder, developer, entrepreneur and trainer Naomi Freeman last week. She shared developer tips, entrepreneurial secret sauce, her success formula and more. Here are the keynotes from our fun, honest and learning experience interview:

Startup Secret Sauce

We had to ask Naomi, who is a serial entrepreneur: what’s the secret sauce to a startup?

“You can find tons of articles talking about startup secret sauces but I think the simplest thing is to make money. That seems obvious, but when you’re in the technology space at least (and sometimes in nonprofits, too), you can kind of lose track. It’s very simple: if you’re not earning money, you don’t have a business,” she said.

If it’s such a simple secret, though, how do people get off-track?

Naomi built an AI prototype and co-founded a company around it. With that in mind, she explained:

“If you build something – and, for me, I built this prototype myself, so I was really deep in it – and the building is great but as soon as you do something cool in the technology space, suddenly you’ve got cameras on you, you’ve got venture capitalists, you’ve got accelerators coming after you. It can be really exciting but if you look on your calendar and do an exercise where you write down every single thing you do for every single hour of a week for one week or two weeks or three weeks, then go back with gold star stickers or little gold money stickers and see where you were actually doing revenue-generating activities (not trying to get venture capital).

We’re talking about meetings for partnerships, we are looking for actually talking to clients who want to pay for things and if you can’t find them anywhere on the calendar where you can put a money sticker without really stretching it, you have a problem.”

It can be exciting to be part of the Silicon Valley culture, but venture capital success doesn’t necessarily mean business success. Quite often, Naomi argues, most businesses aren’t even a good fit for the venture capital model. That doesn’t make the business a failure. It just means it’s not the right kind of business for venture capital.

Pieces Of Advice For “Entrepreneur-To-Be’s” and Project Management

What would you say to prospective entrepreneurs if you could only say one thing?

“I think the greatest advice to prospective entrepreneurs is ‘You got this! No one is gonna take you seriously, but you totally got this!’” she said.

When asked what the best advice for those wanting to dive into entrepreneurship is, Naomi stressed that there’s no single path.

“I guess, more seriously, you hear all kinds of advice about how to do a startup, how to be a founder and at the end of the day it really is a little bit unique for every single person. Some people need that support of multiple co-founders and big boards right out of the gate, some people are really most comfortable once they have a big financial partner or they’re more comfortable when they have their own autonomy.”

Given that there can be so many different ways a start-up can be structured, how do you know if you have a start-up or not?

“At the beginning with that first spark, when you move from ‘I have an idea I want to share with everyone’ to any kind of action, either you have to be all in or you have to know that it’s a great business. These are both start-ups. Whether you’re in R & D for 2 years on venture capital funding or you’re earning money but it’s not your purpose in life, you’ve still just started something. That’s a start-up.”

The best way to beat up competition with a low startup budget

“What makes a startup an unbeatable entity is the community. Again, that’s my perspective, but if it’s just me and you [two co-founders who] want to team up against the world, yeah, the wind can blow us around a lot. But if we build a community of people who come to us, who know us, root for us, it’s a lot harder to get rid of the company. It becomes a much larger, more intangible, less targetable entity.”

How do we make an unstoppable force of the community to support our business?

“There are concrete ways to build a community and it will depend on your business.

Let’s say you’re one of those subscription boxes that goes out every month – you’ve got makeup or books or food in the box. It’s really easy to put on the inside of the box ‘hey, Instagram it, tweet us, show us what you got, tell us how you’re feeling’. If it’s a book, maybe let’s talk about a book club kind of question that you post on Instagram, or blog or tweet about, where everyone can connect. In other cases, say, if you were selling socks, it could be that when you send it out – first, you make sure your boxing is amazing, the unboxing experience is like nothing you’ve ever felt before. It’s like joy comes out of that box, not just socks. Second, when you unwrap the box, there is a thank you card saying thanks so much for being part of this bigger thing.

There are different ways to create community and engage but the key is that people need a way to feel like they’re part of your team and they’re on the journey too. The funding might go but your users and people won’t.

Why are people on Facebook? Cause everyone else is on Facebook. It’s a network effect and people want to be a part of it.”

She went on to explain that you have to create that kind of community and feeling for every company. A company is not just the product(s) it’s selling. It’s also the brand identity that they sell and the community they build up around that not only shares with the company but also shares with everyone else in the community and anyone watching from outside the community.

The most common challenges developers face

What do you think the most common challenge is that developers face?

Naomi explains that the biggest challenge developers face is actually in how they connect – or disconnect – from the people around them.

“It comes back to some other things I’ve been talking about: people get inflexible and isolated. When you think you know better, even though everything around you is changing, and you cut yourself off from your team or your peers because you’re pretty sure you know better, you end up in a really dark place.

There is this myth in Silicon Valley of the individual coder – a hacker in the basement that’s doing all this crazy wire work (or whatever they’re doing) but the truth is, when grown-ups go to work, they interact with lots of other people. That’s just how modern life is.

Unless you own your own business, you don’t get the final say on ‘well, this is the future!’ Unless you own the business it’s actually not your decision what the future looks like, because what you’re really saying is that you are the best person to know what the future of the company looks like, and that’s just not true. I mean, you can take ownership for your decisions at your table but that’s within the framework of whoever owning it saying it’s okay, right?

I don’t want to discourage people but I feel like when people get a little too comfortable sitting where they are, they can end up in that place.”

We hope you enjoyed this interview and got the chance to learn a lot from Naomi’s experience, for us, FogBugz, it was very enlightening and we’re grateful to be able to share this excellent advices!

Collecting Feedback From Stakeholders Can Help You Build Software That Matters

If you want to build great products that your end users will love, collecting feedback early and often is a key step in this process. You also want to ensure that you are not just collecting feedback from the end-users but also from stakeholders within your organization. No matter if it is Charly from Marketing or Cindy from Finance, everyone’s feedback plays a vital role in building the best version of your product or software.

An unwavering and fierce commitment to not just gathering the feedback but collecting, organizing, and sharing the feedback plays a vital role in pushing your product and business forward. Feedback collection in software projects is more than bug reporting. You want to collect experiences and feelings that the users have with your software. The people side of end-user feedback helps you to shape the customer experience of your digital product. Based on a Walker study, 86% of buyers are willing to pay more for a great customer experience.

Why Feedback Matters

Frequent feedback drives and informs your decision making, saves valuable time in the long run, and influences your product/software roadmap.

Feedback is also necessary for measuring satisfaction among your current customers. These are some of your most valuable stakeholders and the kinds of things you are hearing back from your current customers should definitely not be ignored. Use the feedback to create valuable action items to continue to improve your offerings.

Haymo Meran, head of product

Learning and managing how customers view your product, support, and the company overall continues to prove invaluable. By using early and frequent user testing you can uncover things customers may not know they’re thinking about or problems they may not know they’re struggling with. This will provide you with a clear path to make the product and experience better.

If you layer user feedback through every stage of software development, not just at the beginning or the end, you are able to move fast and deliver quality. You can capture feedback manually or with tools  (for internal & external feedback). With integrations available between feedback collection tools/bug tracking/user feedback applications (like Usersnap) and project management software (like FogBugz), you can cover all your bases in the need for feedback from everyone involved.

Screenshot: Usersnap + FogBugz integrated

“How To Do It” Manually

There are many manual ways to capture feedback from users in real time that can sometimes prove to still be effective. Manual feedback collection can be valuable in connecting with the people side of your software or product, especially internally within your organization. During this Digital Age, with technology keeping us connected more than ever, reaching out through email or live chat can be quick and easy. Here are some ways you can quickly capture feedback from the people side:

  • Creating a feedback survey
: Using applications like Survey Monkey, you can quickly and easily create a comprehensive survey to determine things like how the user feels about your software overall? The ease of use? etc. Stakeholders easily reach this survey through a link or from within an email.
  • Direct email and customer contact forms
: Email is one of the most valuable ways to gather candid customer feedback. Sometimes you won’t get a specific answer to your question until you ask. Many people still want to feel valued and like their opinion matters. So you can capitalize on this by simply sending an email and asking what they think.
  • Direct exploratory user interviews: 
It is very true that understanding your stakeholders and users is often as easy as talking to them directly. This can be accomplished through a face-to-face interview or through online video chat applications like Zoom.
  • Through social media
: Social media is a very powerful (and becoming more and more powerful) tool to reach your stakeholders and prospective customer base. There’s always direct comments to your probing social media post or mentions on social networks. But many social networks now have effective polling tools built in. All you have to do is simply ask a question that you want users to respond to.

The downside to manually reaching out to people to collect feedback is not on the front side, but on the backside when you receive responses. It can quickly become very difficult to differentiate the feedback and organize it so that you can learn from it and create action items. Next thing you know you’re getting isses reported, bug reports, and customer feedback from different channels all over the place. Your alerts start going crazy and you start getting pinged on Slack, email, or even in person from teammates about a button that doesn’t look like it is sized right or a request from a user for additional functionality they suggest for in the future. When feedback is reported through different channels, it quickly becomes hard for product managers to get a single backlog of all the user feedback that needs their attention—let alone organize and prioritize the most critical items for necessary immediate action.

This is why it is effective, time-saving and cost-effective to utilize powerful comprehensive tools and technology that can do this for you and allow you and your team to deliver great products faster.

“How To Do It” Effectively

Manual processes are often a lot of work. That is why we suggest a more automated way. If you utilize an automated feedback software, you can capture feedback effectively where it happens and where your users are. This software should be working inside your website or web-based application directly within the browser. After capturing this feedback you need, a software for that can manage all of the responses and move them to the appropriate development teams.

If you use a visual user feedback application in conjunction with a powerful project management software, you will quickly learn how much easier the flow of feedback into your product will become.

There is actually a powerful combination of tools available that can make your feedback collection completely streamlined. You can easily utilize the software program Usersnap for feedback capturing and FogBugz, which is seamlessly integrated, for managing thousands of feedback items.

FogBugz is a comprehensive project management software that helps you spend less time on managing and organizing and more time on creating great digital products. Through a project management system like this, you can easily align your team under a common purpose and set of goals. This allows you to plan, track, and release great software and products. FogBugz provides all you need to make great software, including project management, issue tracking, and support, fused with just enough process to help you deliver. Plus, there’s robust integration with other best of breed tools like Usersnap, Slack, GitHub, and Google Docs.

Screenshot: FogBugz

With the seamless integration of FogBugz and Usersnap, you can save valuable time and resources, and also improve accuracy in bug reporting and feedback versus manual methods.  Used by over 20,000 software development teams, FogBugz is a system that makes it easy to monitor your projects. It helps your team to focus on the tasks that need to be done. You can capture features, tasks, and customer requests in a central location.

Now that you’ve got the project management side covered you have to take a look at your testing and feedback tool side. Bug tracking, website testing, and issue tracking with Usersnap have never been easier. Utilizing the built-in point and click issue reporting, you get visual feedback and additional information faster into your FogBugz project. Now, no you don’t have to ever worry about endless bug reporting for your users again.

Once you have successfully connected Usersnap with FogBugz, you will receive annotated screenshots to your FogBugz project, along with records of advanced client-side JavaScript errors as they occur, every time a bug report or feedback is created with Usersnap. This helps to bring designers, developers, and project managers together on the same page better than many other alternatives. It is very true that a screenshot often paints a thousand words and helps you deliver great products faster.

Screenshot: Usersnap feedback widget in a website

Using a bug tracking and visual feedback application like Usersnap allows your customers or stakeholders to provide a visual description of what might be a bug in form of annotated screenshots. You also get important information such as what browser was used, the used operating system, and the exact location or URL where the bug has occurred. Your testers have the option to use a drawing pen, a highlighting tool, and sticky notes to illustrate and annotate the bug report. With a screen capturing tool enabled you’ll get so much more out of the bug reports in your project management system.

“Usersnap is a great tool for real-time user experience reporting. Our development team relies on Usersnap to effectively capture bugs and user issues as they relate to the user experience. Kudos to Usersnap for easy user adoption.” Tim Smith, HLT

You can solve your project management tickets in FogBugz faster with browser screenshots from your feedback software like Usersnap.

Get detailed information on the integration of Usersnap and FogBugz.

Screenshot: Dashboard of Usersnap

Wrapping It Up

Discovering issues and bugs during the development stage of your product or software saves your precious resources, time, and money compared to if they are just detected during testing or worse during the application launch phase. You want to utilize effective visual testing and feedback through all phases of development.

Utilizing an integration of a project management software and a user testing platform can help you keep your feedback organized and prioritized so that you can address the most pressing issues and create action items to move your team forward on.

Usersnap helps Making Feedback Matter and FogBugz helps Building Software that Matters.
Perfect combination or what? ☺

Start your free 15-days trial of Usersnap seamlessly integrated with FogBugz along with your FogBugz subscription if you haven’t already. No credit card. No strings attached.

Klaus-M. Schremser
Head of Growth, Usersnap


We’re Bad At Interviewing Developers (and How to Fix It) Interview With Kerri Miller

In this interview with Kerri Miller, Lead Software Engineer at LivingSocial, we discuss how to hire and interview developers. We typically don’t get trained on interviewing and we’ve all experienced the haphazard approaches of those new to it – poor organization, repeated questions, fizz-buzz… Kerri tells us how to run interview days, the types of questions to ask, how else we can evaluate candidates and what to do after the interview. For more tips, Kerri writes about software development and hiring on her blog.

Introduction

Derrick:
Kerri Miller is a lead software engineer at LivingSocial. She is also a RailsBridge instructor and frequent conference speaker. She talks about software development and hiring, including the talk, ‘We’re Bad at Interviewing and How to Fix It’. Kerri, thank you so much for taking the time to join us today. Do you have a bit more to share about yourself?

Kerri:
I am actually, in fact, a lead software engineer at LivingSocial. Part of that is working with junior developers, or more junior developers, leading software teams and projects, and I also do a fair bit of work in our engineering culture team, so doing things like how do we propagate a good culture for code reviews, post-mortems, and hiring.

“You want them leaving the interview process regretful that they didn’t get hired, not resentful that they didn’t get hired”

What’s Broken with Developer Hiring?
Derrick:
What do you think is broken with the current way a lot of companies hire and interview?

Kerri:
We don’t do a really good job of hiring with intent. We decide that we need more people, but we don’t do a really good job of figuring out what we need those people to actually do, and who we actually need to hire. I like to think of my software teams as little ecosystems, little, tiny arcologies that exist in a bottle. They’re not entirely a closed environment, and, like any ecosystem, anytime you introduce anything new to that realm, there will be changes. There will be impacts.

Any time you hire somebody, you’re changing that ecosystem. You’re introducing a new species or a new variable to things and it’s going to change. Thinking about what you want to change means that you have to have laid that groundwork to understand where you are at the moment. A lot of teams and companies don’t do a really great job of understanding that. They’re just simply, “We need more bodies. Let’s hire bodies.” They don’t go into these things with a conscious sense of where they are and what they need, and how the future’s going to change by adding more people.

How to Structure and Run Interview Day
Derrick:
Let’s talk about the interview day. How should we structure it, and what are some key aspects you need to get right?

Kerri:
You need to go into it having a plan, and that plan starts with knowing what questions you’re going to ask and why. Understanding that every question you ask that a candidate can’t answer, or every step of that process is an opportunity for a candidate to filter themselves out of that process, it’s a point for you to get information to make that final decision. I think it’s really important that you take a look at what that plan is going to be. If you have, say, three people, and you’re hiring for a front-end developer, you should have one person ask about JavaScript. You should have one person ask about, perhaps, browser interaction, or working with designers, or what have you. Just splitting up that interview so that you’re not asking the same questions over and over again, you’re really able to get really solid signal on a person’s skill sets, what they’re comfortable with, and what their concerns are. What kinds of decisions are they making?

Good Types of Questions
Derrick:
What are good kinds of questions that we should be asking?

Kerri:
Well, I’m not a big fan of whiteboarding, because I think that’s something that we just automatically do, and we don’t think about, “Well, what questions are we trying to answer by asking a candidate to solve a problem?” Are we dinging people for trivia questions, for not remembering, “Oh, I need this third option flag or an obscure method from a core library.” Instead, I really want to focus on questions that are asking about decisions that they’ve made, what choices have they made, and what choices would they make again in the future? Are they reflective about mistakes that they’ve made? Are candidates looking for opportunities to improve, and how do they actually go about it? Do they make plans for themselves, like how they would improve a certain skill set, whether that be a technical skill set or a more soft skill set, for example, management, or project shepherding for example. Those are the kinds of questions that I think really get you at the heart of not necessarily what somebody knows, but what they’re capable of.

Beyond the Interview – How Else to Evaluate Developers
Derrick:
You’re a proponent of evaluating candidates in other ways than just an interview. How else should we be finding out more about potential employees?

Kerri:
I’m a really big fan of pairing on projects, like actually working with somebody. It doesn’t have to be a formal or traditional pair programming situation with one computer and two people, talking through the technical choices that they would be making as they programmed on something. At LivingSocial, we do a code challenge like a lot of companies do, using that as, then, a launching pad to have a discussion with a candidate to say, “You solved the problem using this technique. Why didn’t you choose this other technique? Why did you choose this one? How would you do it better? What if we sat down and refactored?” That’s one really good way to really get the heart of why are they making the decisions they’ve made? Not just did they make this choice because they didn’t know, or are ignorant, or did they make this choice because they had a certain belief about what the requirements of a given project were? That’s one way to do it.

Other ways you can be finding out more about potential employees … I’m a really big fan of asking the employee to explain something to me or teach something to me. In the past, we’ve done this with simply just saying, “You can teach me anything, something that I don’t know, and preferably is non-technical.” How well do they communicate about something that they’re a local expert in but they’re intended audience is not? Could they then go off and go and learn a new framework, or go have a meeting with, perhaps, a stakeholder, or a client, and come back and explain what the actual requirements are to me, to distil down what I need to know and communicate that well? Communication is such a big part of what we do in this job, and so testing for that essential skill in a really clear and explicit way can be really useful and get you a really good signal about who that candidate is and how they’re going to fit into your organization.

“We don’t do a really good job of hiring with intent”

After the Interview – Making the Hiring Decision
Derrick:
After the interview, what are key things that employers should be doing?

Kerri:
I think it’s really important that we don’t just say, “We’re going to get back to you,” but to say, “We will get back to you by Thursday, end of the day.” Then, if you can’t make your decision within those three or four days, communicating that to the candidate so they have expectations that you can meet, because it’s not just good for the candidate, it’s good for you as a company to have that discipline, because you want people to, whether you hire someone or not, you want them leaving the interview process regretful that they didn’t get hired, not resentful that they didn’t get hired. Being professional and upfront and just friendly and encouraging about the entire process is great.

I try always to make sure that, if we can’t hire somebody for whatever reason, we make sure that we give them constructive advice or feedback afterwards, or at least make that available. If you did like somebody, if it came down to either Joe or Mary, and you hire one or the other, keep that person on file, and follow up with them in a few months to see how are they doing, what’s going on? “Hey, we have an open position, would you like to re-apply, or would you like us to consider you for that?” That gets into the part of how you keep metrics on things as well because if you didn’t hire somebody, figure out why you didn’t hire them and then follow up and see, are they actually doing that work, and did we hire the … Not necessarily the wrong person, but did our process let us down? If you assume that somebody didn’t know anything about, say, SQL, and now they’ve gone on to work on a SQL-heavy project, for example, what in our process missed that step?

“It’s really hard to look at who you hire and decide that you have a good or bad process. But you can look at who you don’t hire.”

Derrick:
Great, so we talked about having a plan as part of the hiring process, what’s a good process to follow to make a hiring decision?

Kerri:
When you split up the interview topics, the questions you’re going to ask, and you’re going to consistently ask all of your candidates, it feels a little bit like reading a script, but it really lets you compare apples to apples as much as possible. Once you’re done with your little section of the interview, you should immediately go back to your desk and not get back to work but write down what your impressions were. What were the pros and cons, the bullet points, and find something good about the candidate and something not-so-good about the candidate, something that you wish they did have? Doing that at that moment and passing that back to a central person so as not to … Don’t pass it back to a group, pass it back to a central person, whether that be an HR or the hiring manager, to collect that, so you’re not coloring the impressions of other people.

When you get back into that room with everybody else, whether it’s virtual or real, to really discuss your opinions, you’ve got your opinions of the moment and you can’t be swayed by the impressions of somebody else. For example, if you were supposed to interview them about JavaScript, and the senior JavaScript person, who’s got twenty years of experience in JavaScript, just really did not like that person, how would that color your opinion if you had to give your opinion in that moment? If you wrote it down previously, no, this person really is good at JavaScript, then you’ve captured that honestly and you can really give honest feedback about what that person’s qualities are and what their strengths are without being colored by other people in that discussion.

Measuring and Improving Your Hiring
Derrick:
You hinted at this earlier, but a key part of your approach to hiring is measuring the process to improve it. How could we go about measuring the effectiveness of our hiring?

Kerri:
It’s very seldom that we ever hire anybody bad. When you hear horror stories about hiring, it’s always somebody else’s team that hired that one jerk, or that one idiot, so it’s really hard to quantify because now we know that person, and we’ve worked with them, and we understand their strengths and their weaknesses. It’s really hard to look at who you hire and decide that you have a good or bad process. You can look at who you don’t hire. You can look at that in terms of what were the false negatives? Did we bounce this person out of the process for a specific reason and then it turns out that that reason wasn’t good based on where they ended up going to work?

It’s really easy to LinkedIn stalk people, and peak into their GitHub profiles if they’re doing that sort of work, to see what they’re doing a few months later. It can be really useful to, four, or five, six months down the road, go back and look at the candidates that you passed over and see what they’re doing to understand, if you keep records of the questions that you ask, and the reasons why you maybe didn’t hire somebody, to see if those reasons are still valid.

Other metrics that I think are really, really important to an organization are understanding what your pipeline for candidates consists of. At each step, you have a certain amount of leakage, because people just simply don’t make it through the process or they abandon the process, they disappear. How many people are you losing at each step, and is there one step that you’re losing a lot of people at? Maybe you need to refine that step, remove it, or move it earlier or later in the process based on what your organizational needs are. I think it’s also important to look at who you’re losing as well. Are you losing junior developers at a step that you really don’t want to be losing them at? Are you losing more diverse candidates? Are more women abandoning your process at a certain step than men are, and understanding, or questioning at least, your process to see, is that a problem? Can we fix it? How do we fix it?

“You should immediately go back to your desk, and not get back to work, but write down what your impressions were”

Common Developer Hiring Mistakes
Derrick:
What are some common mistakes you see companies making when hiring developers?

Kerri:
Some of the more common mistakes are hiring from our friend networks. I think that the friend network is such an important part of how we get jobs, but it also tends to reinforce our monocultures a little bit. We tend to be friends with people who are mostly like us, and so those are the people that we’re going to be recommending, and so those are the ones that get hired more often. When I was mentioning earlier how the team is an ecosystem, it’s important to have some diversity there, and not just the diversity we talk about in terms of gender or ethnicity or race, but age, class, looking at people’s technical backgrounds, do they come out of CS programs versus being a self-taught or a boot camp?

Industry backgrounds, did they work in, perhaps, consumer electronics testing before they became an SDET at Microsoft? Were they at startups versus large enterprise companies, or somewhere in between? All those pieces of diversity are going to be influential and improve the health of the ecosystem of your team, and so those friend networks are important for getting candidates in the door, but understanding that that sometimes is going to lead to a certain amount of self-selection for candidates.

You have to, like in soccer, they say, “Run to where the ball will be, rather than where the ball is.” If you have those early conversations about who you need to hire, and what you want to look for, what sort of energy and person do you want to add to your team, to influence it into a good direction? And then go to those people, find them, whether it be through meetups or user groups, or extending your extended network, not just your immediate friend network.

Derrick:
Are there any other resources you can recommend for those looking to improve how they hire developers?

Kerri:
Looking at the different boot camps you’re doing, and how they’re talking to their students, as well as to their sponsoring companies, or the companies that are hiring. I’m a really big proponent of hiring more junior developers, because no one is ever going to know our exact technology stack and our exact way of working, we always have to teach people, so looking at what those boot camps are doing, and how they’re talking about the industry, because they’re trying to set people up for success over the next five years. There’s a lot of wisdom. They’re spending a lot of time to gather wisdom that they can relate to us about who we should be hiring over the next five years, and what skills we should think are important.

Finally, I tell everybody this, go take a relationship skills class. Although they’re sold as being aimed at couples, a lot of that is really about listening to other people and understanding what their concerns are. Once you can start to build those sorts of skills for understanding the perspectives of other people, just generally improves everything about your hiring process, and your team, and how you work with each other.

Derrick:
Kerri, thank you so much for joining us today.

Kerri:
I’m really excited about this topic. I’m glad to see more and more people talking about it. There’s no one size fits all solution. We all face some really unique problems, but there are some commonalities.